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Carefree home - Russ Lyon | Sotheby‚Äôs International Realty Instead, why not buy your Valentine a new home, the ultimate gesture of romance? Russ Lyon/ Sothebys International Realtyagents are showing off what they call some of the Valleys most romantic homes for sale. These luxurious and romantic properties that are perfect for couples who seek to share love and affection within a private setting. -PARADISE VALLEY The first listing is a 5 bedroom, 7 bathroom privately gated estate located in Paradise Valley and listed for $8,850,000.Set on over 1.4 acres, the home captures views of Mummy Mountain, and balances privacy with functionality, style, and authenticity. The master bedroom provides an intimate setting as it is set in its own private nook away from the homes common areas. -NORTH SCOTTSDALE A second listing is a private escape, tucked away on six acres in Carefree Ranch in North Scottsdale.Listed for $4,975,000, the home offers 4 bedrooms, 6.5 bathrooms and is a private gated estate. The spacious yet intimate home features a master retreat with two baths and closets, two additional guest suites, a separate private guest villa, a media room and handsome library with fireplace. A private wine cellar occupies the lower level, along with a pool, spa, and entertainer’s patio, perfect for the couple seeking to host family gatherings -MESA A third luxurious and romantic property is an estate located in Mesa and listed for $3,195,000.The 5 bedroom, 5 bathroom home was custom- designed and built into a nearby mountain to overlook the neighborhood below. There are also multiple covered patios and balconies, perfect for the couple who seek to hold each other in their arms and watch the sunset. One of the estates most unique features is the master bathroom, which is covered in exquisite porcelain tiles and has a Jacuzzi bath with elegant stone steps -CAREFREE A fourth lavish and romantic property is the world famous Wedding Cake home, located in Carefree and listed for $2,950,000. Described as a landmark estate by local residentsand architectural historians, this 4 bedroom, 6 bathroom home is located on Black Mountains Stagecoach Pass and features a distinctive design, tiered like a wedding cake.Coincidentally, there is a rock formation over the home in the shape of a bride and groom, affectionately identified as The Bride and Groom Rock. As a result of its eclectic design and other features Sothebys has named the home One of the most romantic homes in the United States. -FOUNTAIN HILLS A fifth property is a stunning 4 bedroom, 5 bathroom home in Fountain Hills and listed for $1,199,000.Listed by agent Susan Pellegrini, this home balances contemporary elegance with romanticism. Nearly every room in the home provides a magnificent view. The views from the kitchen, which offers the budding chef a DCS gas stove/oven, a Sub Zero refrigerator, stainless steel Bosch dishwasher, and a two-drawer Sub Zerorefrigerator, will undoubtedly inspire amorous couple who prepare meals for one another. Not only this, but upstairs in the home, there are rooms that can be converted into a childrens game room, perfect for the couple that seeks to start a family. Copyright 2016 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved. Connect with CBS5AZ Updated: Saturday, February 13 2016 9:23 PM EST2016-02-14 02:23:39 GMT Counselors and social workers met with students Saturday morning after two teenage girls were fatally shot outside Independence High School in Glendale.A makeshift memorial was growingas students and friends remembered the pair, who were well-known and well-liked..

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“it’s Really An Increase In All The Chemicals In Your Body,” Explains Levinson, “similar To Taking A Shot Of Heroin.

Posted 9:09 PM, February 10, 2016, by stoschlog39 Email HOUSTON, TX– During Valentine’s, it seems it’s all about the heart. Heart-shaped candy. Heart-shaped cards. But does the heart actually have anything to do with love? “Rather than the heart, it should probably be a picture of the brain,” explains Dr. Barbara Levinson, therapist and founder of the Center for Healthy Sexuality in Houston. “Whatever our brain thinks, is always transferred to the body.” “When I was younger, probably love was influenced more by the head,” says Robert Tamayo who married his wife Nicole on Valentine’s Day. “As I got older, it’s more of the heart.” There’s no question your heart races when you’re in love. “It’s really an increase in all the chemicals in your body,” explains Levinson, “similar to taking a shot of heroin. It’s the body’s heroin.” But what about heartbreak? “Oh, I’ve experienced heartbreak,” says Tonya Johnson who is happily in love now, “It feels like somebody ripped your heart out of your chest. And you can’t eat. You can’t sleep.” “Sometimes we don’t know whether or not love is madness, insanity or pure pleasure because it hurts,” says Dr. Levinson. She adds long-term love comes when that first rush of hormones disappears, “When you wake up one morning and you say, ‘ Who are you? It’s not cute anymore that you leave the toilet seat up.’ And so that’s where you have to work out the differences, and that takes hard work. To me, that’s love and commitment.” Head or heart, wherever love comes from– here’s hoping you get some this Valentine’s Day.

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Chocolate, In The Hands Of A Novice, Is Not A Forgiving Substance.

Corvallis Hearing Center There’s something to be said for hard work, and the very essence of romance is uncertainty. Hard work and uncertainty, in terms of how well my creations would come out, would prove the dominating themes, at least at my station. Corvallis personal chef Adrienne Ewanchnya taught the LBCC-sponsored class, guiding 17 novice chocolate artists through the art and science of proper craft. The class got to make ganache an emulsion of cream and chocolate cupcakes, creations from chocolate plastique, and try their hands at decorative piping. But the students learned first how to temper chocolate. This is key to its use as a creative medium and requires a level of care and mixing-bowl perseverance. Once tempered, the chocolate becomes a workable, velvety liquid to be piped, drizzled, spread, and otherwise manipulated to create lace, leaves, rose petals and other bits of confectionery elegance. Of course, there’s all the difference in the world between having created beautiful chocolate art on your own and simply running out to the store and buying a box. That is the lesson: Skill and hard work beget great things in the kitchen for so much less. Chef Ewanchnya best made the point when she explained that chocolate truffles, normally sold for maybe $8 apiece, are made of a simple chocolate ganache with a dusting of cocoa. Knowing how its made makes all the difference. For just a couple dollars’ worth of ingredients, we can dazzle our families with lofty treats. Heres another lesson. Theres a reason why beautiful chocolate is expensive: Its not easy to make. And as I worked away with visions of delighting my darling wife with my creations, I began to consider the words of Woody Guthries song, “Talking Hard Work”: I’m gonna tell ya just how much work I had to do to get this woman I was tellin’ you about. Chef Ewanchnya, herself an LBCC Culinary Arts graduate, walked the class through the important steps, making it look easy while allowing that delicate care is required to get it right. Chocolate, in the hands of a novice, is not a forgiving substance. As students worked away, moving through the steps required to temper their chocolate, some successful and some not so much, my batch was finding its way to the latter category. Once again, Guthrie welled up in my mind: I ain’t never got nowhere, but I got there by hard work. Chef Ewanchnya demonstrated how to make light, ruffly fans of chocolate by spreading the tempered product on a sheet pan and shaving it into curved ribbons with a spatula. Trying to make this work proved a challenge, and the students at that station myself included were glad to have created a sort of chocolate bark that was, at the very least, usable as a topping. Fellow student Karen Schueller of Scio, taking the class for the fun and curiosity, said she’ll likely give some of the methods a try in her home kitchen.

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But The Simplicity Of The Sparks Story Keeps Pulling All Of The Attention Back To The Hard Candy Center.

5, in Fresno theaters. Lionsgate Lionsgate Travis Shaw (Benjamin Walker) and Gabby Holland (Teresa Palmer) in The Choice. Dana Hawley 1 of 2 Order Reprint of this Story Movies made from books by Nicholas Sparks are like those hard candy hearts that are so popular for Valentines Day. They are sweet, not overly complicated and the message is spelled out in very clear terms. The latest adaptation of a Sparks novel, The Choice, is no different. This story about two mismatched people who fall in love despite their best efforts to avoid it clearly stresses the importance of taking time to appreciate the important people in your life. If you dont, there may be a dramatic choice to be made that will change it all. At the heart of the latest love story are the determined Gabby (Teresa Palmer) and the live-big Travis (Benjamin Walker). The pair meet as neighbors living on the coast of North Carolina. Shes a medical school student who has made her career the primary focus of her life. Her well-thought-out life is disrupted by Travis, who lives life to the fullest. Sparks fly when they meet, and it doesnt take a romance expert to know they are headed for an emotional connection. The screenplay by Bryan Sipe based on the Sparks book unapologetically throws every romance cliche into the mix, from a sick dog to a missed romantic dinner. While most of the story looks at the small choices people make that lead them to a moment in time, its a major decision that serves as the cornerstone of the movie. By that time, the audience either cares that Gabby and Travis have found each other and the choice will be emotionally draining or the pair hasnt captivated their interest and the decision ends up being trite and a major gimmick. Its easy to like this couple. Palmer (Warm Bodies) brings a spunky energy to the role that makes her character strong enough to make a free spirit like Travis change his ways. And, Walker (Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter) has a real Southern gentleman charm that makes him likable even when he lives his life like a fraternity brother. Palmers career is filled with her playing characters who have fallen for offbeat guys like zombies and aliens. Its nice to see her finally play the role of an average person who is dealing with love. There are some small story threads featuring Maggie Grace, Tom Welling and Tom Wilkinson. But the simplicity of the Sparks story keeps pulling all of the attention back to the hard candy center. This love story unfolds in the family grounds of North Carolina, always a safe haven for Sparks. Unlike other movies based on his books, this one embraces the geography with more passion and purpose. The ruggedness of the coastline coupled with the uncertainties of the seas that lie just beyond are reflective of whats going on with the star-crossed lovers. It all ends up being familiar pieces of the kind of stories Sparks tells so well. Hes found the right formula of creating likable people, pushing them together and then creating a crisis that will either make or break their love. You have to be pretty cynical to believe there will be a major break. But, in the case of The Choice, the final act reaches melodramatic levels as the story moves toward its finale.

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The Company Was Founded In 2012 And Is Best Known For Concentrates And Medicated Gummy Candy.

Photo courtesy of Allen Park Police Department Two discarded packages of what at first glance appeared to be candy turned out to be a lot more upon a closer look by police. The Allen Park Police Department is issuing a warning to parents and youths about a product found in one of the Allen Park schools that soaks cannabis oil in candy. While many children, as well as adults, might be familiar with Scooby Snacks, from the popular childrens cartoon Scooby-Doo, one of the products is called Doobie Snacks. Doobie also is a common name for a marijuana joint. The other variety found in the school was Canna Cubes. The product information on the packaging says that it is sold By Black Dog Labs for medicinal purposes. The companys website says the organization is based out of Grand Rapids and prides itself on providing high quality medibles made only with absolutes. The company was founded in 2012 and is best known for concentrates and medicated gummy candy. Both are sold in the shapes of various types of candy, and advertised to cause relaxation, relieve stress, generate a sense of euphoria and boost energy. Detective Jim Thorburn declined to release the name of the school where the packages were found and it is unclear where they might have been purchased. He said the most important thing is to alert parents to the product and let them know that children are getting their hands on it. Continued… See Full Story Parents should pay extra attention to their kids after school and to their cell phone use, Thorburn said. Ultimately, they are the ones responsible for the children. They need to monitor their cell phones, and you can do it without the child even knowing. Thats where this all stems from, and how kids communicate. It gives them immediate access to the outside. Thorburn believes by knowing who children are communicating with parents can have a better idea if the child is getting involved in mischievous and illegal behavior. Police stressed that the Dooby Snacks, along with a packaged product called Canna Cubes, are considered drugs just the same and come with the same punishment as being caught with drugs on school grounds. One officer saw it and knew immediately what it was. However he was shocked to see that someone had it inside the school. The packages were empty when they was discovered.

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The Brewers Said It Was Initially Brewed Like A Chocolate Beer And Is Dark In Nature.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Provided Copyright 2015 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Show Caption Next CINCINNATI — Two local brewers are going Hollywood with a new collaboration beer. Tafts Ale House and Blank Slate Brewing Co. teamed up for a unique new brew called Banana Stand. The new beer is a Chocolate Banana Hefeweizen infused with coconut. It was brewed at Tafts Ale House in Over-the-Rhine. COMPLETE COVERAGE: See what’s brewing in the Tri-State SOCIAL: You can take part in the conversation at our #9beer Facebook page too! The brewers said it was initially brewed like a chocolate beer and is dark in nature. It also features cacao nibs from Maverick Chocolates. From there, they used German Hefeweizen yeast to add banana flavors and some fresh coconut to top it off. It’s always fun to work with another brewery that shares the same passion for the beer as much as the business of beer — and Banana Stand is no exception to that. When me and Scott (LaFollette) get together there isn’t anything normal about the brew day or the beer that we come up with, Tafts Head Brewer and co-founder Kevin Moreland said. LaFollette — the owner and head brewer at Blank Slate — and Moreland have had a long friendship over the years in the Cincinnati beer scene. “Brewing at Taft’s Ale House was a great experience. Kevin and I have brewed together before but never on his equipment. It was also fun to brew with Jared (Hamilton) and Patrick (Woods) both of whom I’ve known for years, LaFollette said. The top notch equipment they have at Taft’s allowed us to get creative with some aspects of the process that our little brewing system at Blank Slate can’t handle so it was great to be able to experiment with the equipment as well as the ingredients. The beer is also a cheeky nod at the cult-classic TV show Arrested Development. Fans of the series will remember that the banana stand was a running gag in the show and spurred the catchphrase Theres always money in the banana stand. Both brewers said they like to create unique and inventive beer styles that also have an appreciation for brewing history and fundamentals.

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Her Kids Also Come To The Factory From Time To Time To Make Their Own Chocolate-covered Pretzels, She Added.

The Chocolate Girl owner Tziporah Avigayil Vojdany. Photo by Edmon J. Rodman The mystery was solved by a visit one morning, first by smell the aroma of rich dark chocolate filling the air, then by sight, as a woman carefully poured the molten brown liquid into a mold shaped like a Chanukah menorah. The Chocolate Girl is a temperature-controlled chocolate factory and showroom, complete with a short, moving production line that during a recent visit was coating pretzels with chocolate, which a worker then hand-decorated with blue sprinkles as they moved along. I told them, this week everything has to be blue, said Tziporah Avigayil Vojdany, the owner of The Chocolate Girl, who estimates that she produces 2,000 chocolate- and sprinkle-covered pretzels each day. On that morning, Vojdany also was supervising another candy-maker in the production of marbled chocolate menorahs (white and dark chocolate) that, like all of her creations, are certified kosher and pareve pas yisroel. Located nearly three miles from the apex of Pico-Robertsons other kosher businesses, Vojdany, formerly of Brooklyn, had first rented a space in the Hancock Park area, and then moved her growing wholesale business to its new location in February of this year. In addition to the menorah, which takes two hands to hold and comes with removable chocolate dreidels instead of actual candles, Vojdanys repertoire also includes chocolate novelties for other Jewish holidays, including masks on a stick, clowns and chocolate-dipped hamantashen for Purim, and a chocolate shofar for Rosh Hashanah. She makes lollipops decorated with Happy Chanukah, too. I also make chocolate tefillin (an edible but not wearable treat, unless you get it on your clothes) that is hand-molded, with the Hebrew letter shin, piped on, said the chocolatier, who describes herself as Orthodox. Vojdany is a graduate of Brooklyn College with a bachelors degree in art, and she has been known to dip marshmallows in white chocolate and then hang strings from the packaging to make the confection look like tzitzit. Made with high-end Belgian chocolate and without any dairy products, Vojdanys chocolates can be purchased at various kosher locations throughout L.A., including Western Kosher, La Brea Kosher Market and Ariel Glatt Kosher Market, as well as at Munchies. Vojdany also sells retail online, and she has found a market niche in custom orders for britot milah and baby-namings, weddings and bnai mitzvahs. Looking to satisfy tastes for chocolate beyond the Jewish market, as well as within, she recently took orders for chocolate turkeys for Thanksgiving, and she also produces some items for Christmas and Halloween, as well as for Valentines Day, always maintaining kosher hechshers from both Star-K and Rabbi Avner Katz. The factorys neighbors on Pico Boulevard have been very welcoming, Vojdany said, and she doesnt want to disappoint them, so she occasionally sells from the showroom. One neighbor has dropped in repeatedly to buy her chocolate frogs, and others have rung her bell for Valentines Day hearts and roses. Valentines Day this year fell on a Shabbat. We cant be open on a Saturday, so we worked up until about an hour before Shabbos, locked up and ran home, she said. Vojdany previously ran a retail chocolate shop in the hip and gentrified neighborhood of Park Slope in Brooklyn, and she trained with Michael Rogak, a third-generation chocolatier at JoMart Chocolates in Brooklyn, which has been in business since 1946. He is my chocolate mentor, said Vojdany, who still calls him for advice. Vojdany was divorced and a single mother of two girls when she opened The Chocolate Girl in Brooklyn, in 2007, but she had to close her shop not long after because of the recession. She took a year off, then reopened in a new location in New York that was wholesale only, and along the way, reconnected with a previous wholesale customer, Yehuda Vojdany, owner of Munchies, the popular candy emporium and ice cream parlor in the Pico-Robertson area of L.A.The rest is a sweet story as she says, as the two have since married. Vojdany said her kids have grown up in chocolate. Recently, her 14-year-old daughter entered a contest at her school to make a menorah out of interesting materials, and she chose to do candy and chocolate, the best of both worlds, Vojdany said. Her kids also come to the factory from time to time to make their own chocolate-covered pretzels, she added. For her sons upfsherin, the ceremony for a Jewish boys first haircut, at 3 years old, Vojdany made an entire alphabet of chocolate and mounted the letters on a mirror with his name on it. After his haircut, all the kids got to pull off a letter, making Torah sweet, she said. Is there a difference between L.A. and Brooklyn when it comes to taste in chocolate? People like different things here in California, Vojdany said. Chocolate-covered orange peels are more popular here than in New York. Vojdany also found peanut butter smores a hard sell here, but she thinks she has California hooked on a fluffernutter smore variation filled with peanut butter and marshmallow fluff. She also sells kosher pareve chocolate chips, which, since Trader Joes stopped selling them in 2012, had been hard to find.

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5 Candy And More Dont Miss The City Of Grand Junctions 15th Annual Candy Cane Hunt At Lincoln Park Barn.

120215_gingerbread_house_1a Friday-Sunday, Dec. 46 Something olde Billed as a chance to escape the hustle and bustle of the holiday season, the annual Palisade Olde Fashioned Christmas features three days of music, food and lights, according to the Palisade Chamber of Commerce. At 5 p.m. Friday listen to the Taylor Elementary carolers as they light the town Christmas tree in Town Plaza. On Saturday, theres a Gingerbread Contest and Showcase at the Community Center, a Soup Challenge in the Town Plaza and Breakfast with Santa at Wine Country Inn. Go to palisadecoc.com for information on these specific events, including rules and submission deadlines for the gingerbread competition, and additional event activities. Saturdays festivities go from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., with vendors set up in the Downtown Marketplace or the old Palisade High School gym. Shuttles will run through downtown Palisade. Saturday, Dec. 5 Big and little toys Get on your motorcycle all bikes are welcome and bring an unwrapped toy to the Western Slope Harley Owners Groups 36th annual Toy Run ride that goes from Grand Junction Harley-Davidson, 2747 Crossroads Blvd., to Grand Mesa Middle School. Registration is from 911:30 a.m., and the ride starts at noon as Santa leads the bikes through Grand Junction to deliver the toys. The toys will be given to The Salvation Army. There will be an after-party at Allen Unique Autos with food, a raffle, live music and more. Saturday, Dec. 5 Candy and more Dont miss the city of Grand Junctions 15th annual Candy Cane Hunt at Lincoln Park Barn. Starting at 10 a.m., children can make holiday crafts, sip on cocoa and get photos with Frosty the Snowman before they search for candy canes at 11 a.m. The event is free.

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If They Needed You On The Farm, Maybe You Didnt Write Your Exams That Year.

If they needed you on the farm, maybe you didnt write your exams that year. On Saturdays, he remembers, he and his siblings were often working from sunup to sundown, hacking apart cocoa pods and scooping out their sticky white beans to ferment and then dry in the sunlight. EDUCATION AS THE WAY OUT But on a recent Thursday afternoon, the fields around Kwamang are empty of children. Instead, the local primary school is bursting, with kids spilling from its rickety classrooms onto the playing fields outside. Inside one, Blay and Ms. Mensahs 12-year-old daughter Boatema is hunched over a notebook, carefully copying out sentences from the days English lesson. Choose One: Ghana is free from/for colonial rule, reads one. Like most of the kids at this school, Boatema and hersix siblings work on their familys farm, but only on weekends and school holidays, and they are largely kept away from the most arduous and potentially harmful tasks. Blay, who is also a teacher at a nearby secondary school, says this setup is now par for the course in this part of Ghana. Still, sometimes we find families who are working their children and not sending them to school, and when you come to them they say, If my kids doesnt work, how will we eat? he says. I tell them, you will all eat better if your kids get an education and break this cycle [of poverty]. Indeed, experts say education has been the single most influential element in breaking the cycle of child labor on West Africas cocoa farms, for the simple reason Blay describes: Its a way out. The change has been dramatic. The number of children not attending school in cocoa-growing communities across Ghana has fallen by 87.5 percent over the past five years, according to Tulanes surveys. And in Cote dIvoire ground zero for child trafficking in the cocoa industry the figure has been cut by 36 percent, even in the midst of a civil war and its aftermath. Earlier this year, Cote dIvoire took an important new step when it passed a law mandating primary school attendance for the first time. (Ghana already had a similar law). Although statistics on trafficking are notoriously hard to come by, Mr. McQuade, of the anti-slavery coalition, says research suggests theres been a modest decline in children being transported and sold into slavery in the cocoa industry over the past decade, coupled with much wider gains on the issue of child labor. How much of that change comes down to the interventions of the international chocolate industry itself is debatable. The International Cocoa Initiative the major umbrella body for industry, civil society, and governments working on child labor issues estimates that less than 5 percent of farmers are being actively monitored for harmful child labor practices, including trafficking.

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“your Bravery And Commitment Ensured We Could Live In A Democracy,” He Said.

Veterans and community members gather in the City Council chambers at City Hall in Pittsfield on Wednesday for a Veterans Day ceremony. A stubborn rain “He attended every [ceremony] he never missed a single one.” Munson joined an overflow crowd that spilled into the hallway outside the City Council chambers to honor both living and deceased veterans. The ceremony is traditionally held at the Pittsfield Veterans Memorial off South Street, but Wednesday rain forced organizers, the Berkshire Veterans Coalition, to cancel the parade for the first time in years and move the ceremony inside. Originally called Armistice Day to commemorate the end of World War I on Nov. 11, 1918, Veterans Day pays tribute to all who have served America home and abroad. Coalition President Francis Tremblay waxed poetic when he described what is a veteran. Veterans and community members gather in the City Council chambers at City Hall in Pittsfield for a Veterans Day ceremony due to the rain cancellation of the annual parade. (Stephanie Zollshan The Berkshire Eagle) “A veteran is a person who answered the call, entered a war and gave it his all,” he said at the podium, flanked by the wreaths various veterans organizations would have laid at the base of the memorial. Keynote speaker Bernard Avalle said the definition of a veteran is summed up in the oath enlistees take entering the five the U.S. military. The servicemen and women swear to defend, protect, preserve and bear allegiance to America, but the solemn declaration indicates an allegiance veterans have for one another, he said. “It cements a new relationship, a ‘brotherhood,’ ” said Avalle, who served in the Coast Guard from 1972-76. “This is evident in such mottos as, ‘I’ve got your back,’ ‘Not on my watch,’ ‘Leave no man behind,’ and ‘Never again.’ ” As executive director for Pittsfield Community Television, Avalle urged veterans in attendance to show up at the PCTV studios on Federico Drive to tell their stories for the record, so future generations will know the service and sacrifice they made to keep America free. Mayor Daniel L. Bianchi called on everyone to be committed to helping all veterans access the programs and services they need, especially those struggling to overcome the physical and psychological trauma of combat. “Your bravery and commitment ensured we could live in a democracy,” he said. Wednesday’s ceremony also honored Pittsfield’s Veteran of the Year. The Berkshire Veterans Coalition name Herman Tyrone Belanger as the recipient of the plaque, who belongs to six area veterans groups active in all. Tyrone Belanger addresses the crowd after receiving the Veteran of the Year award from the Berkshire Veterans Coalition for being active in six local veterans groups. (Stephanie Zollshan The Berkshire Eagle) A retired Pittsfield postal employee of 37 years, Belanger served in the Marines from 1964-67, including one tour of duty in the Vietnam War. He thanked his wife, Linda, for freeing him up from some of the household chores on behalf of local veterans.

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